The Musical World of Rocky Horror

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 24, 2010 6:14 pm 
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Hey, I'm looking for those blue skies through the tears in my eyes! :lol:


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2010 9:37 am 
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:banana: please put the film on here! I've been waiting all my life!

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2010 1:43 pm 
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Joe,

I would assume if this does exist and is real, it is not an audience bootleg but something filmed in some kind of official capacity by the people involved in producing it.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 27, 2010 3:09 pm 
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Awesome! Got a little clip of it?

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 02, 2013 3:17 pm 
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Any update on the video?

Jamie.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 03, 2013 5:40 am 
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timeslip325 wrote:
and, altho i'd take the obc Rocky Horror Show in b&w... it's sad to think we'd miss out on the full colour! ;)


Actually, its very likely if this does exist and was shot on color film stock, the color has faded to all hell. At the time of the show the majority of available film stock was a type that is prone to fading very badly. Many variables factor in to how badly it may ahave faded, storage conditions, if it was even processed and washed properly in the first place, things of that nature. It would be a miracle if this was on color film stock and had not faded yet. So, b and w might be the better option.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2013 3:22 am 
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If this guy really does have this film, you need to tell him this right away!! It may already be too late if this film has been sealed for many years. If it does have VS, I am a film collector and so is Kevin Boycik. One of us can at least attempt to get it transferred to video so as to save the perfomance. If it is in early stages of VS, the VS process may be able to at least be slowed down with a special chemical that claims to be able to stop VS (although this has not been proven beyond a reasonable doubt yet.) If it has VS, he will be able to tell because it will smell like Vinegar.

This is VERY serious. We need to save this film if it actually exists. Pronto. He needs to know. If he doesn't believe you, tell him to look up vinegar syndrome online. It is very real. MANY film negatives and whatnot have been lost to this VS.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 01, 2013 10:14 pm 
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Wouldn't it be funny if Rocky at the Belasco ALSO turned up in that fabled African stash of 90 Doctor Who tapes? :-P


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 11:43 pm 
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It's been a while since i've been on here lol, Speaking about this subject (The Belasco Production), I found these photos on gettys image:

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Meatloaf and Tim backstage at Belasco
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 23, 2014 8:11 am 
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Until recently, I wouldn't have believed that any show of that era was filmed.
The Australian Cast was filmed in color with sound in 1976, with Max Phipps as Frank. It has deteriorated a bit, but is absolutely incredible. I am helping to restore the sound, and hopefully the celluloid will be re-edited into the complete show, and transferred. It belongs to the Max Phipps Estate.

You can see stills from it on this page: http://www.ozrockyhorror.com/Melbourne%201975.html

If Australia filmed a show in color and sound, then it's always possible, other theatres did too.
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Attachment:
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 23, 2014 8:22 am 
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ozmarky wrote:
Until recently, I wouldn't have believed that any show of that era was filmed.
The Australian Cast was filmed in color with sound in 1976, with Max Phipps as Frank. It has deteriorated a bit, but is absolutely incredible. I am helping to restore the sound, and hopefully the celluloid will be re-edited into the complete show, and transferred. It belongs to the Max Phipps Estate.

You can see stills from it on this page: http://www.ozrockyhorror.com/Melbourne%201975.html

If Australia filmed a show in color and sound, then it's always possible, other theatres did too.

OH My > Now THAT IS EXCITING. Please keep us updated.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 23, 2014 4:46 pm 
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The show played, in Australia, for 3 years, in it's first run. It always played in "cinemas under demolition". The Melbourne cast performed in a rotting movie palace, that was demolished afterwards. The film includes the audience arriving, and the theatre being demolished at the end. Several thousand color photos are used over the audio for the arrival and closing.

The show, then went into revivals from 1977 to 1988, with Daniel Abineri playing the role 2000 times. His performance was captured on video, as was the Reg Livermore 1984 return season.

The USA has a great network of fans who find, fix, and distribute, anything theatre related, Australia doesn't.
People here, are very coveted of the things they own. It took me 5 years to find the 1976 film, after I found out it existed.
There are also, many full audios of the show, through all it's stagings in Australia. There are 6, just of Melbourne. I will be working with those, to restore the film to it's full length.

It's a pity that nobody has access to it, as it's an amazing capture of the best stage show. Max Phipps, is truly special as Frank. I wouldn't have guessed it, but he's unique and beautiful. He's dead now, and the film passed to his best friend, who had been the lighting tech for the entire run, and also the official photographer. He supplied all the photos on my Melbourne and Adelaide pages.

A TV crew, filmed the "Unlock a mind, unmind a lock" speech, and other parts, to use, but never did. They are multi-angle and broadcast quality, and are being integrated into the film, as it's the same cast.

I saw the show 4 times in it's original form, in a cinema, with the catwalk, and demolished after. One theatre literally blew away in a storm. The show stayed as an "homage to the death of innocence in movies" till 1989, from then on it was a celebration of the motion picture, as it still is, song order changed, and it played in normal theatres. This is nothing like seeing the original show, in a rat-infested, ruined cinema, where the Usherette and the theatre's remains, make this show happen from the rubble.

After seeing The NEW Rocky Horror Show in 1992, I was so saddened to see what it had become, and I knew I'd never see the real show again. Seeing the film of it, has made that easier. I detest the show as it is today.
Interesting to note, Australians didn't call back at the cast, for the entire 14 years it ran, except spontaneously, but rarely.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 5:10 am 
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ozmarky wrote:
The show played, in Australia, for 3 years, in it's first run. It always played in "cinemas under demolition". The Melbourne cast performed in a rotting movie palace, that was demolished afterwards. The film includes the audience arriving, and the theatre being demolished at the end. Several thousand color photos are used over the audio for the arrival and closing.

The show, then went into revivals from 1977 to 1988, with Daniel Abineri playing the role 2000 times. His performance was captured on video, as was the Reg Livermore 1984 return season.

The USA has a great network of fans who find, fix, and distribute, anything theatre related, Australia doesn't.
People here, are very coveted of the things they own. It took me 5 years to find the 1976 film, after I found out it existed.
There are also, many full audios of the show, through all it's stagings in Australia. There are 6, just of Melbourne. I will be working with those, to restore the film to it's full length.

It's a pity that nobody has access to it, as it's an amazing capture of the best stage show. Max Phipps, is truly special as Frank. I wouldn't have guessed it, but he's unique and beautiful. He's dead now, and the film passed to his best friend, who had been the lighting tech for the entire run, and also the official photographer. He supplied all the photos on my Melbourne and Adelaide pages.

A TV crew, filmed the "Unlock a mind, unmind a lock" speech, and other parts, to use, but never did. They are multi-angle and broadcast quality, and are being integrated into the film, as it's the same cast.

I saw the show 4 times in it's original form, in a cinema, with the catwalk, and demolished after. One theatre literally blew away in a storm. The show stayed as an "homage to the death of innocence in movies" till 1989, from then on it was a celebration of the motion picture, as it still is, song order changed, and it played in normal theatres. This is nothing like seeing the original show, in a rat-infested, ruined cinema, where the Usherette and the theatre's remains, make this show happen from the rubble.

After seeing The NEW Rocky Horror Show in 1992, I was so saddened to see what it had become, and I knew I'd never see the real show again. Seeing the film of it, has made that easier. I detest the show as it is today.
Interesting to note, Australians didn't call back at the cast, for the entire 14 years it ran, except spontaneously, but rarely.



That's a great story about every place the show was done being demolished afterward. Brilliant.

I wish I could see the stage show in ay form withou out all the audience hubub. It's a bunch of BS, save it for the film. It's the same in america as far as the stage show usually being a celebration fo the film, and that's sad. I wish more people actually treid to understand the story, the shows origins and pay tribute to that than the film. I can watch the film at home and in the cinema. Shadowcasts put the film live on stage every weekend. Would some please jsut do the damned stage show!!!!!


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 5:36 pm 
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The show, played abandoned cinemas, in London and Australia, only the USA didn't run the show as it was intended. Lou Adler made The Roxy look like an old cinema, except with tables and bar service.
When it went to Broadway, Brian Thomson, wanted it to play an old cinema in the Soho region, but the offer to use The Belasco, cheap, swayed O'Brien. It, of course, was a disaster.

You should, arrive at a disused movie house, in a terrible state of disrepair.
The auditorium is completely covered with dark blue canvas, with ACME Demolition stencilled on it. The curtains are open, exposing the screen, which has an "apology for the inconvenience" message projected on it. The side walls have scaffolding running from the stage to the back. The centre aisle has a ramp running from one of the cinema's doors, onto the stage. There is an old coke fridge on one side of the scaffolding, and the band on the other. The room is dimly lit, and ushers in masks (actually cast members) harass the patrons, sitting and staring till they yelp. There are body parts amongst the rubble and threadbare carpet.

The ushers eventually stroll onto the stage, in front of the screen, turn and yell "Glad, you could come tonight". The lights go out, and a spotlight hits a lone usherette, holding a candy tray, she sings, Science Fiction. You realise you are watching the last gasp of a cinema in decline. The usherette, is going to show her fantasy, from years of movies, using only the cinema, the screen, the scaffolding, and even Eddie coming from the fridge. Frank made his entrance, with a loud bang, as the back door flung open, and he walked up the catwalk onto the stage. The usherette becomes the maid in her own story, but returns to an usherette for the close.

Without the setting, it becomes about the storyline, which is silliness. The decaying movie house, gave it a reason.
The dialogue is a mix of British horror studios Hammer films and the sexy comedy film series, "Carry On" (O'Brien had been in a Carry On). Frank is based on a vaudeville drag act, that Jim Sharman saw, as a kid. The lingerie costumes came from Lyndsey Kemp's The Maids, just turned around, so they lace up the front. The interpretation of "a typical American couple", wasn't realistic, but how Britain and Australia perceived them, so Brad and Janet's costumes were changed for The Roxy, to be believeable to Americans.

Double Features, were the staple of British and Australian cinemas, till the end of the 70s, and by 1973, often included a Hammer horror, or a Carry On, or both. The garish colours, overt sexuality, and "naughtiness" that was cinema's last attempt to draw crowds, was the basis of the show. The death of the double feature, the movie house, and the age of innocence. In 1974, it made sense, and the references were immediate to British and Australian audiences.
America saw it without it's setting, and then the film, which also removes the framework, making it a funny, but confusing piece.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 7:30 pm 
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ozmarky wrote:
The show, played abandoned cinemas, in London and Australia, only the USA didn't run the show as it was intended. Lou Adler made The Roxy look like an old cinema, except with tables and bar service.
When it went to Broadway, Brian Thomson, wanted it to play an old cinema in the Soho region, but the offer to use The Belasco, cheap, swayed O'Brien. It, of course, was a disaster.

You should, arrive at a disused movie house, in a terrible state of disrepair.
The auditorium is completely covered with dark blue canvas, with ACME Demolition stencilled on it. The curtains are open, exposing the screen, which has an "apology for the inconvenience" message projected on it. The side walls have scaffolding running from the stage to the back. The centre aisle has a ramp running from one of the cinema's doors, onto the stage. There is an old coke fridge on one side of the scaffolding, and the band on the other. The room is dimly lit, and ushers in masks (actually cast members) harass the patrons, sitting and staring till they yelp. There are body parts amongst the rubble and threadbare carpet.

The ushers eventually stroll onto the stage, in front of the screen, turn and yell "Glad, you could come tonight". The lights go out, and a spotlight hits a lone usherette, holding a candy tray, she sings, Science Fiction. You realise you are watching the last gasp of a cinema in decline. The usherette, is going to show her fantasy, from years of movies, using only the cinema, the screen, the scaffolding, and even Eddie coming from the fridge. Frank made his entrance, with a loud bang, as the back door flung open, and he walked up the catwalk onto the stage. The usherette becomes the maid in her own story, but returns to an usherette for the close.

Without the setting, it becomes about the storyline, which is silliness. The decaying movie house, gave it a reason.
The dialogue is a mix of British horror studios Hammer films and the sexy comedy film series, "Carry On" (O'Brien had been in a Carry On). Frank is based on a vaudeville drag act, that Jim Sharman saw, as a kid. The lingerie costumes came from Lyndsey Kemp's The Maids, just turned around, so they lace up the front. The interpretation of "a typical American couple", wasn't realistic, but how Britain and Australia perceived them, so Brad and Janet's costumes were changed for The Roxy, to be believeable to Americans.

Double Features, were the staple of British and Australian cinemas, till the end of the 70s, and by 1973, often included a Hammer horror, or a Carry On, or both. The garish colours, overt sexuality, and "naughtiness" that was cinema's last attempt to draw crowds, was the basis of the show. The death of the double feature, the movie house, and the age of innocence. In 1974, it made sense, and the references were immediate to British and Australian audiences.
America saw it without it's setting, and then the film, which also removes the framework, making it a funny, but confusing piece.


Yeah, I am aware of how the show should be done and what its original intention/setting was. I once saw a small production a few years ago in Chicago that set the theatre up the way you describe, including the "Sorry For the Inconvinence" signs. THe Usherette of the theatre sang the song and it was a brilliant set up. It really seemd the director understood the material. However, Once science fiction was over the production went to shit. They pretty much directly copied the film after that. So disappointing.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 9:09 pm 
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Sorry, I wasn't sure if you knew how it played!
It was like that for so long, I took it for granted that it wouldn't change. I'd have gone more often if I'd known. It's all sparkly now, where it used to be scummy.
I saw it in an Opera House built in 1888, that had become a cinema in the 1920s and Rocky was it's last gasp before it came down, brass domes, angels and all. Also saw it in a rundown Art Deco cinema that was blown away by a cyclone. Saw it twice there, once with Reg Livermore.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2014 9:19 pm 
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On the topic of film of The Belasco production, I'm not aware that this exists.
I'll ask some cast members, but I'm sure they don't know of it.
Susan Morse, Abigail Haness, Jamie Donnelly, and B. Miller, were surprised that an audio of the Belasco existed, and they would have mentioned seeing footage. I don't know Tim Curry, but the others have never said anything about film.
When the Melbourne cast was filmed, in 1976, Max Phipps had asked for it, as he thought nobody had recorded the show on film anywhere.


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